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The Patrician, Vol. 4 John Burke

The Patrician, Vol. 4

John Burke

Published September 27th 2015
ISBN : 9781331431381
Paperback
610 pages
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Excerpt from The Patrician, Vol. 4The reign of Edward III. forms the most martial and chivalrous period of English history. On the roll of the military worthies it produced - and the brilliant category includes Edward the Black Prince, Audley,MoreExcerpt from The Patrician, Vol. 4The reign of Edward III. forms the most martial and chivalrous period of English history. On the roll of the military worthies it produced - and the brilliant category includes Edward the Black Prince, Audley, Chandos, and Manny - few names stand more prominently forward than that of Sir Hugh Calveley of Lea. Froissarts romantic pen commemorates with graphic force the achievements of the Cheshire knight, and it is indeed observable that the old chronicler rarely touches on Sir Hugh without placing him in the very foreground of his living pictures. The family from which this renowned warrior sprang, was a branch of the ancient House of Calvelegh of Calvelegh, in the Hundred of Edisbury, which is traced to Hugh de Calvelegh, who became Lord of Calvelegh in the reign of King John by grant from Richard de Vernon. The first Calveley of Lea wasDavid de Calvelegh, (2nd son of Kenric de Calvelegh of Calvelegh, ) who obtained a grant, temp. Edward III., of the lordship of Lea, in the Hundred of Broxton, Cheshire, previously a part of the extensive possessions of the Montalts and the Montacutes. He married twice: by his first wife Johanna he appears to have had four sons- the eldest of whom,Sir Hugh Calveley, succeeded to Lea, and was the celebrated soldier, whose achievements have rendered the name so familiar to the historic reader. He first appears in the public events of his time as one of the thirty combatants who, in 1351, engaged, in mortal strife, an equal number of Bretons, for the purpose of deciding some differences which had arisen out of the disorders committed by the English after the death of Sir Thomas Daggeworth. The Bretons gained the victory by one of their party breaking on horseback the ranks of the English, the greater number of whom fell in the engagement. Knolles, Calveley and Croquart were captured and carried to the castle of Josselin. The Lord of Tinteniac, on the enemys side, and the gallant Croquart, on the English, obtained the prizes of valour. Such was the issue of the famous Combat of Thirty. A cross, still existing, marks the battle field, known to this day as Le champ des Anglois.About the PublisherForgotten Books publishes hundreds of thousands of rare and classic books. Find more at www.forgottenbooks.comThis book is a reproduction of an important historical work. Forgotten Books uses state-of-the-art technology to digitally reconstruct the work, preserving the original format whilst repairing imperfections present in the aged copy. In rare cases, an imperfection in the original, such as a blemish or missing page, may be replicated in our edition. We do, however, repair the vast majority of imperfections successfully- any imperfections that remain are intentionally left to preserve the state of such historical works.