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The Transylvania Journal of Medicine, and the Associate Sciences (Volume 6) John Esten Cooke

The Transylvania Journal of Medicine, and the Associate Sciences (Volume 6)

John Esten Cooke

Published January 11th 2012
ISBN : 9781154097016
Paperback
378 pages
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 About the Book 

This historic book may have numerous typos, missing text or index. Purchasers can download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. 1833. Not illustrated. Excerpt: ... The region around presents a great variety ofMoreThis historic book may have numerous typos, missing text or index. Purchasers can download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. 1833. Not illustrated. Excerpt: ... The region around presents a great variety of plants, forming an interesting field for the botanist. The springs issue from a calcareous schist, similar to the saliferous rock which forms the floor of the salt springs of New-York. The principal spring belongs to the class Salino-sulphur. On analysis it has been found to contain the following ingredients. 1. Sulphuretted hydrogen, (abundant.) 2. Carbonic acid, 3. Muriate of soda, (abundant.) 4. Muriate of lime, 5. Sulphate of magnesia, 6. Carbonate of iron, (a trace.) The quantity of iron is so small as not to affect, in any great degree, its medicinal operation. The effect of the water is purgative, diaphoretic, and alterative. It may be used with advantage in all those diseases connected with an increase of arterial action. In dyspepsia, and constipation, the use of it may prove highly salutary. It is proper to state, that for most of the above particulars we are indebted to a correspondent whose name wc have forgotten. Art. VII.--Case of Exsection of the Lower Jqw. By George W. Campbell, M. D., of Columbia, Tennessee. (Communicated by Dr. R. C. K. Martin, to the Editor.) THE operation of exsection of the lower jaw being of rare occurrence, induces the following report. The subject, Mr. Gooch, about a year previous to the operation, suffered from an attack of ordinary autumnal fever. His convalescence was slow, arising, as was supposed by his physician, from some hepatic derangement, for the removal of which, calomel was freely administered, and produced the specific effect of that article. His habits were irregular, and internperate. The history he gave of his disease was nearly as follows: --About six months previous to his application for relief, while chewing a piece of beef at dinner, which it required more..